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changed his positions on the settlement and the peace process. he realized he made a terrible mistake in the first term. he insisted on a settlement freeze as a preconditio. it wrecked peace negotiations and stopped everything. he changed, went back and said in a startling statement that if you get a peace agreement, the sttlement will be resolved-- talled automatically. so, they are not the central issue. by removing that, i think he changed the relationship with the israelis in a positive way. >> in some ways, i think he is right about this. it is also true that benjamin netanyahu is facing a different situation at home. he does not have the same kind of majority, came closer to losing than people thought he would. obama was reelected despite his attempts to prevent that. so, they both have an interest in getting something done. i think it is highly remote that anything will get done. the neighborhood has only gotten more dangerous. >> colby king? >> i thought it was important that he made the trip. ultimately, if there is going to be peace in the area it will have to come from thos
polarized about hugo chÁvez. there are a lot of people he changed. i was looking to the woman that had tears in her eyes. she said her life had changed. what is for sure is that the size of the comparison to him being a dictator what is for sure is that he is going to be remembered as a changing figures here in the country. >> we can still see pictures that does come m from c 00 than just coming in from -- we can still see pictures that are just coming in from caracas we know this announcement was made by the vice president. what do people make up vice- president maduro? >> maduro was not the most popular of people. then mr. chavez appointed him as his successor. in polls are round october, he only received about 4%. this was during the election. pollsters were trying to figure out whether there were other candidates between mr. chavez and his party. maduro was that the most popular one. just before mr. chavez left for cancer surgery in cuba, mr. chavez appointed him. did that seem to give him enough popularity. for now people think that mr. chavez picked him for a reason. today's press conf
and cuts they made and changes they have tried to accomplish in those very short eight months. that is what they are hoping the accreditation team does see that they have at least made a really good effort. >> how did they get into this mess? >> that is a point of conversation in the last eight months. when the accrediting team came last spring, they looked at what had happened six years ago. they have to take a look every six years at how the college is working. six years ago, they gave the college a couple of points to address and to change and to look at. essential essentially, they did not change them. they continued operating. when they came back last spring, nothing has been done and things were worse. >> if they had the recommendations, they were supposed to file six years ago and they never did it. have any heads been identified to roll? >> not that i know. they are looking at that. they are looking more to become one and move forward and address what has been given to them essentially and to become a cohesive college and serve the students that they need to continue to serve. >> sp
thing. but even though we're living longer, one thing that hasn't changed -- the official retirement age. the question is, how do you make sure you have the money you need to enjoy all of these years? >> additional corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by boeing. additional funding is provided by the annenberg foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. once again, live from washington, sitting in for gwen ifill this week, doyle mcmanus of the "los angeles times." doyle: good evening. the issue of same-sex marriage was front and senter this week in washington as never before. before the supreme court two, cases focused on the same social issue but raising very different legal issues. supporters and opponents were hoping the court would clarify whether gay and lesbian couples have the right to marry and if so, should they have the same benefits as opposite sex couples? in one case, a challenge to the defense of marriage act passed by congress and signed into law by bill clinton in 1996, defini
changed his opinion. liza mikulski says her views are evolving. hashe president himself said his views evolved. i would not be so ironic using the word when applying it to republicans. aboute thing i would say the supreme court is i hope they learned the lessons of roe versus wade. ruth later ginsberg said that that decision stymied -- ruth bair ginsberg said that decision got in the way of a political process and took it out of a political arena. it gave a lot of people the sense that they had been robbed of the opportunity of being involved in the process and that is why 40 years later you have marches. i hope they understand that to do this, as you showed with the pupil, with opinion changing so rapidly -- with the pew poll, with opinion changing so rapidly, the best thing the allow this to is change with the expression of popular will. even if they end up on the wrong side, they had a legitimate shot and a decision has legitimacy in and of itself. >> for the record, north dakota this week enacted the toughest restrictions on abortion in the nation. opponents say they are trying to
. the balance of risks is changing. the crisis is worsening. we are entering that new phase. cracks in iran, western countries and their arab friends -- >> in rome, western countries and their arab friends are building up one side of support. it is dangerous and unpredictable, but slowly and steadily, the world's most powerful countries are being pulled into the syrian civil war. the west is deepening its involvement with the syrian opposition, not just with political figures, but also with men who have taken up arms against the sr regime. regime.st the assad the next phase has not happened yet, but they have taken a significant step toward it. >> for more on the significance of this announcement and the effort of the opposition in syria, i'm joined by the bbc's and panel. he has reported extensively within syria. thanks for coming in. what does this offer of food and medical supplies mean to the rebels? >> i think, very little. the state of america's new policy is to try to persuade president as dogbane to change his mind could i do not think anything here implies that. -- to. assad to cha
that in washington tonight. do relations with america change? >> it was a surprise to hear jesse jackson praying and then he asked got to build bridges between the states and venezuela. the states are the only ones who pay cash for 3,000 barrels. the others are interchanged with china, russia and places in the caribbean. there's a hate and love relation. whenever it's going to be better then the government says that the yankees cater to chavez and they fire our assistant to chavez here. but i think his successor must be more conciliatory. i think the surprise was jesse jackson and maybe he was surprised that someone asked for better relations with the states. they were helping a lot on establishing relations. >> you mentioned the oil and, of course, america is the biggest importer of venezuelan oil. it has to have good relations with this country but it is looking for an alternative to this system of government. do you think now the opposition in venezuela could have success? >> it would be very difficult. the emotion on chavez, the sentiment and the government controls all the power. there's no
how easy it is to make changes if you are an outsider. >> he is not an outsider in that he has worked in the vatican and has served on various commissions. he knows a lot of the personnel involved, but you are right. he has been out of the vatican for a long time. i think that will give him strength. it gives him a vision. it gives him a particular scope of what has to be done. there is so much wait and see about all this, isn't there? >> we will leave it there. thank you for a much indeed for that. it has been an extraordinary atmosphere in st. peter's square. a little earlier we got the reaction from latin america, the first latin american pope, the first known as the wood. >> a huge moment for this region and for the catholic church. in the church behind me, brazilians were hoping this was going to be the announcement of the first brazilian coast, a huge amount of expectation. people were hoping of brazilian would make it to become the pope. a little bit of disappointment but also excitement and interest that they have the first quote from this continent. a latin american pope, and
're not talking about secular model of reform meaning changes to church teaching on matters such as abortion or birth control. instead they're talking about changes in business management in the vatican towards making the bureaucracy here more transparent, that is both internally and externally, making it clearer who's making decisions and why and also doing a better job communicating with the outside world towards making it more accountable. that is the idea that there ought to be penalties for poor performance and towards making it efficient. the notion being is that there thinking in centuries may have cut it once upon a while but in a 21st century world it simply doesn't do it anymore. that's what these cardinals mean by reform and they have embraced pope francis tasman who can deliver it. whether it plays out in practice that way, of course, remains to be seen. >> brown: is there an expectation that on one key matter the sexual abuse scandals that he has to do something fairly quickly,? whether it's make a gesture or take action? >> well, i think it's very clear to anyone who's been pay
in venezuela and they're asking that in washington tonight. do relations with america change? >> it was a surprise to hear jesse jackson praying and then he asked got to build bridges between the states and venezuela. the states are the only ones who pay cash for 3,000 barrels. the others are interchanged with china, russia and places in the caribbean. there's a hate and love relation. whenever it's going to be better then the government says that the yankees cater to chavez and they fire our assistant to chavez here. but i think his successor must be more conciliatory. i think the surprise was jesse jackson and maybe he was surprised that someone asked for better relations with the states. they were helping a lot on establishing relations. >> you mentioned the oil and, of course, america is the biggest importer of venezuelan oil. it has to have good relations with this country but it is looking for an alternative to this system of government. do you think now the opposition in venezuela could have success? >> it would be very difficult. the emotion on chavez, the sentiment a
underweight u.s. stocks compared with what they ought to be, and is that behavior changing? is the flow of funds more into equities so far this year or not? >> it is, tyler. we're seeing more flows into equities this year which is a good trend. obviously, we've seen a cycle over the last four years, and that's really rocking the boat. and what we need to do is get people back to the middle. think about a diversifiy eied portfolio, we'll see people continue to buy as the population ages. we need to keep inflation in mind. equities are the only place that is really going to outpace inflation over long periods of time. and people investing in whether it's for accumulation or even income distribution, you need to be thinking about inflation when they think about their allocation to equities. >> brian, i want to ask you about we're all waiting for the s&p to hit its closing highs, just a few points away, for investors. and i guess for a market strategist, which is more important for you to see the strength of this rally? is it these new highs on 30 dow components or is it the s&p 500? >> it'
to take that position. portman explained his change of heart in "the columbus dispatch". he said it began two years ago, when his college-age son told his family that he is gay. wall street backed up a bit as the week ended. that ended a ten-day winning streak by the dow jones industrial average-- its longest in 17 years. the dow industrial average lost 25 points to close at 14,514. the nasdaq fell nearly 10 points to close at 3,249. for the week, the dow gained just under 1%. the nasdaq rose a tenth of a percent. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: thousands of activists gathered this week for one of the conservative movement's biggest events. "newshour" congressional corresspondent kwame holman was there. >> reporter: for four decades the conservative political action conference known as "c- pac" has served as a barometer for republican politics. and this year, the g.o.p.'s future direction is the issue for more than 10,000 delegates who've been meeting just outside washington. at the last few gatherings of c- pac, the focus was on taking back the
. the crisis is threatening the eurozone. >> reports coming in from europe suggest the eu may have changed the deal, to allow people with deposits of less than 100,000 euros to get off that tax. i spoke a short time ago with former u.s. treasury secretary tim -- larry suckers -- i spoke a short time ago with former u.s. treasury secretary larry summers. >> it changed the world. sarah gave a was a small place -- sarajevo was a small place. it matters so much because of theexample that may be in process of being set. it has heretofore been assumed that insured deposits of ordinary citizens are as good a credit as exists in these countries. the apparent decision that is not the case, with the endorsement of the european authorities, with the endorsement of the imf, calls that into question. there is little wonder that markets are experiencing a change in the way the world that, and it is change they find unsettling. >> if you are a middle aged retiree in italy or spain today, are you really looking at what is happening in cyprus and thinking, you know what, i might take my savings out of the
for the light. but ermon than diplomacy the man was hoping to change the way america was seen in the world when we came into office. obama has shown a passionate respect for their country that is sweet music to israeli ears and many liked his push for peace. one newspaper declared "love has paid a royal visit." >> for our sons and daughters are not born to hate. they are taught to hate. so let us fill their young hearts with the same understanding and compassion that we hope others have for them. >> he mailed tribute to zionism at the grave of its modern founder. the new friendlier approach is already working and he's urging israeli prime minister netanyahu -- he's made a surprising apology to his turkish counterpart in 2009 obama's first big policy speech was in crier ro. -- cairo. >> and this cycle of suspicion and discord mustened. >> tonight the president arrived in jordan knowing many in the arab world watched that speech and waited and wapetted. in this trendy tafoya in the jordanian capital those i talked tofelt let down, further -- to felt let down. >> i think he is exactly like all the
position has actually clade from 2008. what has changed is the political calculus of course risk. in the democratic party it's riskier to keep your safe position from yaur -- four years ago than to do what she did. obviously the calculus on the republican side is different but we are still seeing a lot of republicans saying look, times have changed and generations have changed. gwen: didn't we think times were going to change on gun matters too after newtown in we saw the assault weapons ban, which honestly didn't have that good a chance of passage but now completely pushed to the side? >> the senate is going to take up the gun legislation when they come back from their recess next blo -- next month. it is pretty clear from harry reid's statements this week that the more ambitious measures such as an assault weapons ban are not going to get through the senate. i think the politics of the issue remain what they always were, think -- which is that there is broad public support for a lot of these measures but it's geographically intense in some areas and not in others. but i also th
a certain amount of change. i just want to caution -- i think a lot of americans think -- when they think of reform and change they think we're going to have women priests. that was not a realistic expectation given the cardinals who were in there. i think what they mean by reform touched other issues, partly reorganization of the curia, its relationships with local bishops and, again, are we going to focus a little bitless maybe on the traditional latin mass and a little bit more on caring for the poor. >> ifill: so this is not a pope or a papacy we're going to see any kind of change when it comes to things like abortion or -- >> of course not. >> ifill: gay marriage. >> of course not. >> ifill: or adoption or any social issues that get us so worked up, especially in the united states? >> no, and these are not issues in the latin american church. when 50% of your people are living below the poverty line, shame on you if you're worried about other issues like that. you've got to be very hand on worried about feeding your people so they don't go to bet hungry at night. >> ifill: he was quo
. police say he was the leader of the gang. it triggered outraged and a change in attitude toward women. the prosecution was seeking the death penalty, but stung by his death, families say they suspect this was foul play. this was not suicide says his father. the relatives of the delhi student are angry, too, saying mr. singh has been allowed to cheat justice. >> this is embarrassing to the indian authorities, and it is astonishing it could happen to the lead accused in the most high profile case it has seen in years and in india's most secure jail. the trying of four other men accused and one juvenile will go on. but again, the indian authorities are in the dark as well. andrew north, "bbc news," delhi. >> two american soldiers were killed in afghanistan today by an afghan police officer. it is the second insider attack in three days and it comes after a very tense weekend visit by the u.s. secretary of defense. president karzai accused america of talking to the taliban. we asked what sense we could make of the comments. >> he is in part speaking to a local audience, who are increasing
-- we need this first before any changes will be done. >> and from angela merkel, more caution. >> just because two countries have changed their minds does not mean 25 others have to follow suit. >> david cameron said lifting the embargo would not necessarily mean britain army rebel groups right now. the french have been a little more forceful, but the issue will now be passed to foreign ministers to decide. the current embargo expires at the end of may. if no compromise is found, britain and france could choose to let the embargo last and then go it alone. that would be controversial, but they have certainly use the second anniversary of the conflict to send a message -- "we are not doing enough." overr more on the debate whether to arm the rebels and what if anything the major powers can do to stop the with georgee spoke w. bush's national security adviser. a year ago, you argue that farming syria's rebels was desperately required. where do you stand now? series rebelsg was desperately required. >> we are late. we should have done more before now. >> will britain and france get anywhe
. this kind of assessment -- we need this first before any changes will be done. >> and from angela merkel, more caution. >> just because two countries have changed their minds does not mean 25 others have to follow suit. >> david cameron said lifting the embargo would not necessarily mean britain army rebel groups right now. the french have been a little more forceful, but the issue will now be passed to foreign ministers to decide. the current embargo expires at the end of may. if no compromise is found, britain and france could choose to let the embargo last and then go it alone. that would be controversial, but they have certainly use the second anniversary of the conflict to send a message -- "we are not doing enough." overr more on the debate whether to arm the rebels and what if anything the major powers can do to stop the with georgee spoke w. bush's national security adviser. a year ago, you argue that farming syria's rebels was desperately required. where do you stand now? series rebelsg was desperately required. >> we are late. we should have done more before now. >> will britai
's been nine years since gavin newsom issued marriage licenses at city hall. a lot has changed. the shift is to the support for gay marriage. we have seen prominent republicans come out in support of it. how does that change your job next week before the supreme court? >> really, it doesn't and shouldn't effect what is a legal case that we are looking at interpretation of the u.s. constitution. things like public opinion polls and the political pressure that could be brought to bear really are not -- that's just not for a legal case like this. >> scott: you think the justices are more or less immune to that? >> i think the justices are used to being sucked into a political debate. their limited role as judges to interpret law. >> scott: what is the thing you and your team have to make sure the justices hear on tuesday? >> one of the most important things is the justices realize this is not just an issue of marriage, but states' rights and federalism. it would be unfortunate to have same-sex marriage imposed. marriage redefined for all 50 states by the intervention of the federal courts, t
into their 90's and that's a great thing. one thing that hasn't changed -- the official retirement age. the question is how do you make sure you have the money you need to enjoy all of these years? >> additional corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by boeing. additional funding is provided by the annenberg foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. once again, live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. some weeks demand more analysis than others. white house tours were canceled but it wasn't about that. republicans and democrats issued competing budget blueprints but it wasn't about that either. what it seemed to be about as self-definition, a sudden recognition that in the eyes of the american people they've been doing it all wrong, so the president went repeated by to capitol hill. >> over the last several weeks the press here in washington has been reporting about obama's charm offensive. all i've been doing is just calling up folks and trying to see if we can brea
changed that whole way of thinking. if he can resign, well then such taboos are now over. >> rose: you said an interesting thing which you said which was the idea of first of all was he a man of faith, and secondly, was he a man who could govern. governorring seemed to be an important quality here. >> definitely. there's a real sense that things have to be straightened out. there was a great feeling of drift under benedict. his mind was focused on writing his biography of jesus and being a theologian and he was somewhat aloof and removed from matters. i don't cover the vatican closely i don't have a complete handle on his papacy. you can't have a shera come in who doesn't have the whole package, projecting piety and projecting a sense of faith that will stimulate people to return to the church or reinforce the church. that's got to be essential really at least in the minds of the cart numbers. >> rose: stay with me, i wanted to bring in monsignor. >> i wanted to say something. he was latin american and the church in latin america is very important to the church and the holy sea. >> r
need a culture change with the regulators. i talk about this a lot in my book. you've got a lot of good-will intentioned people, but they confuse bank profitability with bank safety and soundness. they're not the same thing. there's the right way and there's a wrong way to make money. they're almost aligning themselves to bank managers and wanting to have the appearance of profitability because they think that makes a sound banking system. it's really upside down. you can't ignore the problems here. some of that is overlooked. >> we thought we were going to get a culture change after the big crash. >> yeah, well, i think it's coming slowly but not fast enough. it's amazing that, you know, so many years after the crisis less than half of the dodd frank rules have been completed. a lot of them are watered down. >> by? >> well, the regulators have come to do this. some of the provisions in dodd frank had too many provisions, but we get more exceptions when these proposals come out such as the volcker rule. we get these rules that are hard to enforce and easy to game. >> when dodd frank and
that has taken place will change the use of drones. >> how will it change the use of drones if it does? >> i'm not sure it will change the use of drones. i have not seen the administration give in enough from so critiques you have seen about drones. i think there still is a relatively dominant-- in washington that drones are a highly effective form of warfare. one of the possibles is this works with attenuated notion of effectiveness. we look at effectiveness in terms of body count, in terms of we killed someone who was a potential terrorist who might some day strike the united states. i think the administration needs to realize there are is a wider set of political and strategic costs and to measure those costs, those costs might then change the way the drones are used going forward. i have not seen movement yet to suggest the administration is rethinking its position. >> rose: resa brooks, tell me where you think the debate is now? >> i think the debate to some extent is in the wrong place right now. i think it's actually important to draw a distinction between drones which is just a
everything that we can to combat the threat of climate change, that we're going to be creating jobs and economic opportunity in the first place. they are going to be a great team. these are some of my top priorities going forward. >> ifill: moniz is an m.i.t. physicist who runs an energy initiative on new ways to produce power and curb emissions. he also served as undersecretary of energy during the clinton administration. mccarthy already works in the administration as assistant administrator for the e.p.a.'s office of air and radiation. she has run state environmental agencies in connecticut and massachusetts, working for five governors including mitt romney. moniz and mccarthy would replace outgoing cabinet members steven chu and lisa jackson. early last month the president also tapped business executive sally jewel to replace ken salazar as interior secretary. the nominees face major challenges. one imminent decision involves debate over approval of the keystone ex-seal pipeline that would move crude oil from canada to the gulf. the project has drawn environmental protests but a
. let me talk about news first quickly, hugo chavez. what impact will his death and whatever changes are met take place in venezuela mean for the oil industry? >> well, it's very early to tell, obviously. he has just now passed away, and under their constitution the costs for them to hold elections within 30 days because he never stood for an-- and until we see the outcome of that election and in particular we see how organized the opposition parties may be able to get themselves together for the election. it's going to be hard to tell what the immediate affect will be. and whether his successor chooses to carry on his programs and in particular the focus of his programs and the alliances that he established, or whether they choose to broaden out their perspectives. and i think at this stage it is very difficult to tell what the successor may choose to do. >> he nationalized the oil industry in venezuela. >> well, he, they always had a national oil company. when he took over he did narrow the scope of the holdings of international oil companies, changed the contracts. and invited us
to what we heard from them in the past. they want to change medicare for people starting in 2024 and turn it into more of a voucher program where people go out and buy their own private health insurance. they want to block grant things like medicaid and food stamps so that it goes through state funding. it changes from an open entitlement program to something that will only support people as long as the money lasts. and they want to unwind some things that federal government spends money on, like housing giants fannie mae and freddie mac. but these are really policies that we have heard from them before. there wasn't a lot of new substance there. >> brown: in fact you were at the press conference. i was watching a reporter pointed that out to paul ryan. he was sort of... we saw a little bit of it. he was unapologetically continuing on, no matter what happened in the election, right? >> there's a feeling on the part of the house republicans that although the presidential election was lost for the republican party, the house republicans feel like they still maintain the majority in the hous
of the united nations. but even there today, a brief moment of silent tribute. this is a moment of change, undoubtedly. also, this is not about politics. it is about a man and a deep, a visceral sense of loss. >> hugo chavez's koffman has just arrived at the military academy -- coffin has just arrived at the military academy, where he will lie in state until friday. i spoke with the former venezuelan minister of trade who joins us from new york. well hugo chavez's brand of populism outlive him? >> it will. there are several forces that he unleashed in the country that are going to be there for awhile. at the front of the debate, the poor and needy. he was very vehement about their exclusion he also did that in a highly polarized in fashion. the politics of rage and revenge have become part of the political fabric of the country and that is one of the many wounds that need to be late -- shield, whoever -- that needs to be healed, whoever his successor is. >> you think that will come with the election, whenever that is? >> this is not an end -- a normal election when there is a political pa
a change in the way business is done here would affect other states who may be lined up also with laws that preempt or somehow trump federal law? >> well, as deputy solicitor general said. if the federal law is just viewed as a floor here. for example, if arizona wins, then he said states can impose additional requirements on registration, and the federal lawl itself becomes a nullity. that is the fear of a lot of organizations from the orgses that brought the challenge to the league of women voters that filed an amicus brief supporting the challengers. congress' intent here was to make registration easier. they fear that if arizona wins, then other states are going to impose other kinds of requirements, not just proof of citizenship. so that is the real concern. if arizona loses, there is no change. on the other hand, the final word may rest with congress. whatever the supreme court does, congress could go and amend the national voter registration act. >> ifill: sounds like there could be a consequential ruling. >> it's definitely a very important case and playing out against this bac
, showing signs of changes to come already. just six months after being shot in the head by the taliban today, a girl returns to school. targeted for campaigning to get girls the same rights and was back inmallalah the classroom in britain. she said she missed her classmates from pakistan. she also said she is looking forward to meeting new friends in birmingham. >> because of the state of the people, i can even walk -- i can even run out. yousafzai only narrowly escaped an assassination attempt in pakistan. following her recovery, this is her first day back at school here in britain. >> all the children should go to school. it is their basic right. >> it is her uniform that she is most proud of unlike most teens. >> it proves that i am is today. it is the happiest day for me this year. i am living my life, my own life, going to school and learning. >> she was a student when she began campaigning for girls rights to an education. taliban extremists shot her in the head. since then, she has been receiving treatment in birmingham. >> at 15, she has already seized responsibility, taking he
's a great thing but one thing that hasn't changed, the official retirement age. how do you make sure you have the money you need to enjoy all of these years? >> additional corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by boeing. additional funding is provided by the annenberg foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. once again, live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. there is something baffling about where we find ourselves in washington tonight. lawmakers spent the better part of the day, and the week, daring each other to meet in the town square at high noon, and when they did, neither liked the outcome all that much. the president popped into the white house briefing room today, at times expressing frustration, other times high mindedness, but making clear who he blames for the budget standoff. >> i am not a dictator. i'm the president. so, ultimately, if mitch mcconnell or john boehner say, we need to go catch a plane, i can't have secret service block the doorway, righ
there is a pull-back. but there are a lot of hurdles to make any significant changes beyond this. gwen: i'm curious though about this revenue issue because in some ways, one of the things that john boehner, the house speaker came out and said that it's off the table that there would be anymore revenue. from the short run he's right. >> it certainly looks that way. but what's intriguing that the administration's response is let's not try to move around the immovable object of speaker baner or the senate minority leader mitch mcconnell who is dead set against that. that's why you set the outreach to paul ryan, the chairman of the budget committee perhaps in hopes of maybe doing an in-run around the leadership. gwen: does what happen in washington matter when it comes to wall street or when it comes to these job numbers? is washington action or inaction driving the markets at all or depressing them? >> oh, absolutely. i would say that the main reason that the stock market has had such a good strong start to the year is because washington didn't tank the economy of doing a variety of silly th
at the brookings institution. and gordon chang. he was an attorney in hong kong for twenty years. now, an author and contributor to forbes.com. let me start with you ken lieberthal. what do we need to know about xi jinping? >> the most important thing we know is he's going to govern china for the next decade and that will be enormously important for china, asia and globally. he's worked his way up to every level of the chinese political system so he's a very experienced politician and administrator. he's coming on a program saying he's trying to clean up corruption, revitalize the communist party and keep in the power and use these capabilities to reform the chinese economic system while maintaining or building military strength. >> woodruff: is there something about his background we should know? >> his father is a comrade of mow say dung, which makes him a princeling. he's the first communist party to be born after the communist leadership came to power. xi jinping is in a system and a politburo at least for maybe five of those seven member bodies are conservatives, the hard line anti-reformer
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 183 (some duplicates have been removed)